until 31 October Huid & Haar (Skin & Hair)

Huid & Haar (Skin & Hair)


A ceramic pink wig by Per B. Sundberg (1964, Sweden), the architectural sculptures by Shahpour Pouyan (1979, Iran) and 3D printed vases by Olivier van Herpt (1989, Netherlands). Keramiekmuseum Princessehof (The Princessehof Ceramics Museum) in Leeuwarden presents an eclectic selection of contemporary acquisitions from 13 February to 31 October 2021. All works were acquired over the past six years under the watchful eye of Tanya Rumpff, curator of modern and contemporary ceramics. Skin & Hair: Acquisitions Contemporary Ceramics 2015 - 2021 is a reflection of Rumpff's love for ceramics. She will say goodbye to the Princessehof in the autumn.

For this group exhibition, curator Rumpff selected w…

A ceramic pink wig by Per B. Sundberg (1964, Sweden), the architectural sculptures by Shahpour Pouyan (1979, Iran) and 3D printed vases by Olivier van Herpt (1989, Netherlands). Keramiekmuseum Princessehof (The Princessehof Ceramics Museum) in Leeuwarden presents an eclectic selection of contemporary acquisitions from 13 February to 31 October 2021. All works were acquired over the past six years under the watchful eye of Tanya Rumpff, curator of modern and contemporary ceramics. Skin & Hair: Acquisitions Contemporary Ceramics 2015 - 2021 is a reflection of Rumpff's love for ceramics. She will say goodbye to the Princessehof in the autumn.

For this group exhibition, curator Rumpff selected works by Cristian Andersen, Erik Andriesse, Adriana Baarspul, Claude Champy, Tal R, Navid Nuur, Johannes Nagel, Nicholas Pope, Olivier van Herpt, Oscar Santillan, Shahpour Pouyan, Per B Sundberg, Rachel de Joode and Johnny Rolf. Sundberg's Wedge II is the latest in a collection of contemporary acquisitions and donations initiated by curator Tanya Rumpff. "What I find so special about these works is the unexpected, the unattainable and the mysterious. A ceramic artist never knows what will come out of the oven. You can't really get your fingers behind it. And that is exactly what I find fascinating about ceramics. There's something alchemical about it, like seeing a wizard at work.", said Rumpff.

Experiment
Huid & Haar shows a broad, international collection area. In addition to a diversity in form, function and origin, the works also show to what extent contemporary ceramic artists experiment in their working method. For example, the interplay of photography and sculptural work by Rachel de Joode (1979, the Netherlands), who photographs surfaces of clay, gypsum, skin and earth and prints them on ceramics. Sky Excavation by Oscar Santillan (Ecuador, 1980) originates from clay from four different extraterrestrial soil types (Venus, Mars, Mercury and the Moon). The composition of the raw materials is a collaboration between the Ecuadorian artist and astronomers. The exhibition is an ode to contemporary ceramics, in all its forms. From organic to experimental and from East to West.

Personal stories
More than any other medium, ceramics is timeless and belongs to everyone, seductive and practical, as a design and an object, is a mirror of the culture from which it originates. The artists choose ceramics because of the bluntness and malleability, the changeability of the material, which cannot be manipulated at all after the risky firing process. In addition to the works themselves, the stories surrounding the acquisition also play a role. All acquisitions have been added to the collection under the wing of curator Tanya Rumpff. In the exhibition, she talks about her fascination with ceramics and the philosophy behind these acquisitions.

Collection Netherlands
A museum collection never stands still, thanks to funds and donations from private individuals. Visual ceramics has developed into a dynamic and popular discipline within contemporary art. In recent years, the National Ceramics Museum Princessehof has developed into a leading museum in this field. Highlights include the exhibition In Motion (2017) and Human After All (on view now). Curator Tanya Rumpff plays a leading role in this. On the second floor of the museum, contemporary art and current design are central, with four to five solo presentations per year, such as in recent years by Jennifer Tee, Babs Haenen, Lennart Lahuis, Anne Wenzel, Floris Wubben and Johan Tahon. The museum is actively developing its collection, also as a source of inspiration for new generations of designers and artists. The Princessehof wants to be a platform for the development of ceramics as an independent discipline in visual art and to ensure that these developments are well represented in the Collection Netherlands.

Partners: Ottema-Kingma Foundation, Association of Friends of the Princessehof Ceramics Museum and Club Céramique.

This exhibition has been made possible in part by the Mondriaan Fund (the public stimulation fund for visual art and cultural heritage) and the Van Achterbergh-Domhof Foundation.

The Princessehof Ceramics Museum is co-financed by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science and the Municipality of Leeuwarden.

Contact

Address:
The Princessehof National Museum of Ceramics
Grote Kerkstraat 11
8911DZ Leeuwarden
Plan your route

When

  • every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday until October 31st, 2021from 11:00 to 17:00

Location

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